In order to get myself a little more familiar with the UJK Technology Router Bushes, I decided to do something fairly straightforward and recreate the curved finger pull detailed in the previous Blog post.

Making the circle jig
Making the circle jig

To make this example, the first thing required was a circle jig. Now there are some very fancy, all singing, all dancing jigs that can be built, but I’ve always found that simple usually works best and so I made my jig from an oddment of decent quality 8mm multiply, sufficiently long so that a circle with a radius of about 750mm could be machined.

Setting the radius for routing
Setting the radius for routing

On the bottom of the Festool OF1400, there are two tapped holes in the base that can be used to attach ‘shop made jigs, but it should be noted that they’re NOT equidistant from the central axis of the router, so some care needs to be taken in marking out. I found a couple of suitable hex bolts which I cut to the correct length and also used a hacksaw to make some slots for a screwdriver. It may be obvious, but I strongly advise not to overtighten the bolts as there’s a danger of stripping the threads in the router base.

Ready to machine the template
Ready to machine the template

The radius was set to 250mm by simply drilling a small hole for a pivot screw at the correct distance.

Template machining completed
Template machining completed

The router is then set up with a 19mm straight cutter and plunged (with overlapping cuts) several times through the template material to form the curved shape, which is now ready to be used with the router bushes.

Bush and cutter inserted
Bush and cutter inserted

In order to obtain the widest finger pull, I needed to select a combination that would give me a small offset, so I opted for a 12mm bush and 8mm cutter. This resulted in a 2mm offset (12-8÷2=2mm) which meant that the final width was 15mm (19-2-2=15mm).

Completed finger pull
Completed finger pull

To finish off I softened the hard edge of the finger pull using a small chamfer bit with a bottom bearing in the router. The UJK bushes are very versatile, but the most awkward thing is to fully understand how the offset works, which is why I’ve included the sums.
As I’m no good at sums, it also makes it easier for me!

  • Eric

    Mr Stoakley says ” simple usually works best” (I agree) so I’d like to share my simple way of “attaching” the router to the wooden base:

    Choose a suitable size guide bush and use a similar sized Forstner bit to drill a hole into the wooden base; fit the guide to the router and drop it into into the hole. Job done – no messing with getting the fixing screws into the right positions. (Admittedly you’ve still got to get the pivot hole in the correct position but that is the same with all such jigs.

    There’s another advantage with this technique, particularly if you are using the fixture to cut a complete circle – as the router rotates around the pivot the router handles stay in a comfortable position – no need to cross your arms!

    • Rob Stoakley

      That’s a good tip, many thanks.

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